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Global forum for wildlife conservation, protection and relief
Vietnamese National Short Film Festival | Operation Game Change Launches in Vietnam March 3rd | March 3rd World Wildlife Day! | Get Involved: Tell us what YOU think | Obama Administration Plans to Aggressively Target Wildlife Trafficking | Japanese Tourists Arrested for Wildlife Smuggling in Thailand | Thai Army Rescues 150 Pangolins in Chiang Mai | Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund Digital Photo Contest
  • ACRES (Animal Concerns Research and Education Society)   is a registered charity and...
  • ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) is an organization whose vision is to ensure biodiversity is...
  • Association of Southeast Asian Nations Wildlife Enforcement Network (ASEAN-WEN)  is the...
  • Everyone depends on Earth’s ecosystems and their life-sustaining benefits, such as clean air,...
organization profiles
Chinese National People's Congress Deputy Who Raises Tiger Resigns
Updated : 06/03/2015
Prince William tackles illegal wildlife trade in China
Updated : 06/03/2015
Kenya Sets Ablaze 15 Tonnes of Ivory
Updated : 05/03/2015
INTERPOL encourages global action on World Wildlife Day
Updated : 05/03/2015
Singapore Customs, AVA seize two tones illicit ivory
Updated : 05/03/2015
Vietnamese National Short Film Festival
Updated : 03/03/2015
March 3, World Wildlife Day: Getting Serious About Wildlife Crime
Updated : 02/03/2015
Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund Digital Photo Contest
Updated : 26/02/2015
China's ivory 'smuggling' tourists face prison over Thai souvenirs
Updated : 22/02/2015
Thai Army Rescues 150 Pangolins in Chiang Mai
Updated : 20/02/2015
Pair arrested for wildlife smuggling
Updated : 20/02/2015
Obama Administration Plans to Aggressively Target Wildlife Trafficking
Updated : 12/02/2015
Illegal import: 22 Tibetan antelope wool shawls seized
Updated : 11/02/2015
Hong Kong Customs seizes 92 tonnes endangered rosewood, clutches two culprits
Updated : 09/02/2015
Vietnam’s traditional healers take oath against rhino horn
Updated : 03/02/2015
Thai Airways bans ivory cargo on all flights
Updated : 30/01/2015
Police seize frozen tiger, monkeys transported illegally in central Vietnam
Updated : 26/01/2015
Malaysia is not spared as a transit point for illegal ivory shipment
Updated : 26/01/2015
Undercover researchers: Never-before-seen lizards for sale in Philippines
Updated : 26/01/2015
More than 2300 turtles seized at Jakarta international airport
Updated : 23/01/2015
Fingerprints 'breakthrough' for wildlife crime investigators
Updated : 14/01/2015
All kinds of illegal trade on Myanmar's border
Updated : 13/01/2015
Ivory products pulled from fourth major Hong Kong retailer
Updated : 08/01/2015
Fur-Trapping Rises in ID to Meet Asian Demand
Updated : 07/01/2015
Trade liberalization sparks fears of cross-border crime boom
Updated : 03/01/2015
Ivory outlets in Chatuchak market inspected
Updated : 27/12/2014

recent studies

  • CITES World Wildlife
    A new era of global cooperation to conserve and sustainably use wildlife was launched on 3 March, 1973 at the World Wildlife Conference in Washington D.C. with the signing of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).  Raising awareness of the intrinsic value of wildlife and its various contributions to sustainable development and human well-being was given a boost in December 2013 when the UN General Assembly proclaimed 3 March as World Wildlife Day. CITES is an inspiring example of successful international cooperation and national action that gives us hope for a sustainable future in which people and wildlife coexist in harmony. John E. Scanlon, Secretary-General of CITES Full CITES Report

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  • Fighting Illicit Wi
    This report summarizes the views of a number of governments and international organizations on illicit wildlife traffi cking. These views were collected through a series of structured interviews, and this report is the first to provide a snapshot of current governmental and intergovernmental opinions on this topic. The current global approach to fighting illicit wildlife traffi cking is failing, contributing to the instability of society and threatening the existence of some illegally traded species. The governments and international organizations consulted on this issue agree that the current approach is not suffi cient. However, opinions on the responsibility of different actors vary: countries that are primarily associated with demand are concerned with enforcement on the supply side, while countries that are primarily associated with supply are concerned with education and enforcement on the demand side. International organizations and government representatives point out that while there are individuals within governments and international organizations who are passionate about halting illicit wildlife trafficking, it is not a priority for governments.  Full Report

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  • Global Impacts of th
    Poaching of endangered species to feed the illicit global trade of wildlife – estimated to be worth between $8 and $10 billion per year excluding fisheries and timber – is rising at an alarming rate. Activity in the illegal ivory trade has more than doubled since 2007 and is over three times larger than it was during the last peak in 1998, with the street value of ivory capable of reaching up to $2,205 per kilogram in Beijing. Rhino horn can sell for $66,139 per kilogram – more than the price of gold or platinum – on the Chinese black market. This report analyses the global impacts of the illegal wildlife trade, investigating links between the illicit trade in wildlife products and the erosion of national institutions in affected countries, national and transnational security threats and the role of armed non-state actors in civil conflict. Elephants and rhinoceros are most prominent among the animals being killed to feed rising demand for their tusks and horns across the world. On the basis of the evidence provided by a detailed literature review, this report focuses on the illegal trade in elephant ivory and rhino horn originating in sub-Saharan Africa. Full Report

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